3753 Cruithne

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3753 Cruithne (play /ˈkrɪnjə/, from Old Irish [ˈkrɪθnɛ]; Modern [ˈkrɪhnʲə] or [ˈkrɪnʲə]) is an asteroid in orbit around the Sun in 1:1 orbital resonance with that of the Earth. It is a periodic inclusion planetoid orbiting the Sun in an apparent horseshoe orbit.[2] It has been incorrectly called "Earth's second moon", but it is only a quasi-satellite.[2]

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Discovery

Cruithne was discovered on October 10, 1986, by Duncan Waldron on a photographic plate taken with the UK Schmidt Telescope at Siding Spring Observatory, Coonabarabran, Australia. The 1983 apparition (1983 UH) is credited to Giovanni de Sanctis and Richard M. West of the European Southern Observatory in Chile. It was not until 1997 that its unusual orbit was determined by Paul Wiegert and Kimmo Innanen, working at York University in Toronto, and Seppo Mikkola, working at the University of Turku in Finland.

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