Abessive case

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In linguistics, abessive (abbreviated abe or abess; from Latin abesse "to be distant"), caritive and privative (abbreviated priv) are names for a grammatical case expressing the lack or absence of the marked noun. In English, the corresponding function is expressed by the preposition without or by the suffix -less.

The name abessive is derived from Latin abesse "to be away/absent," and is especially used in reference to Finno-Ugric languages. The name caritive is derived from Latin carere "to lack", and is especially used in reference to Caucasian languages. The name privative is derived from Latin privare "to deprive."

Contents

In Afro-Asiatic Languages

Somali

In the Somali language, the abessive case is marked by -laa or "-la" and dropping all but the first syllable on certain words For example:

In Australian languages

Martuthunira

In Martuthunira, the privative case is formed with two suffixes, -wirriwa and -wirraa. What determines which suffix is used in a given situation is unclear.

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