Abipones

related topics
{god, call, give}
{woman, child, man}
{son, year, death}
{land, century, early}
{@card@, make, design}
{specie, animal, plant}
{area, part, region}
{ship, engine, design}
{black, white, people}

The Abipones (Abipones in Spanish, singular Abipón) were an indigenous nation of Argentina's Gran Chaco, part of the Guaycuru languages linguistic group.[1]. They ceased to exist as an ethnic group in the early 19th century.[2] A small number of survivors assimilated into Argentine society.

History

The Abipones originally occupied the Chaco region of Paraguay, east of the Paraná River[1] They were originally a seasonally mobile people of hunters, gatherers, fishers and to a limited extent farmers.[2]

In 1641 the Abipones had already obtained the horse from the Spanish settlers and abandoned farming for cattle and horse raiding. By that time they still lived north of the Bermejo River[3] They became feared by their neighbours and the Spanish farmers, and even threatened major cities.[2][3]

It is likely they were driven south of their original range by the Spaniards and other native tribes, such as the Tobas.[3] They were finally concentrated in the Argentinian territory lying between Santa Fe and Santiago del Estero,[1] between the Rio Bermejo on the north and the Salado River on the south.[3]

From 1710 a major military effort by the Spanish began gradually to impose authority on the Abipones.[2] By 1750 Jesuit missions had been established among them (chiefly by Martin Dobrizhoffer, who had been a missionary in Paraguay for eighteen years[3]), and they had been Christianized[3] and forced to become sedentary.[2] The colonies had incessant trouble with Spanish settlers, and were often raided by the Tobas and the Moobobis, another warlike tribe. [3]

By 1768 over half of the Abipones had succumbed to disease.[2] and they numbered not more than 5,000.[4] The expuslion of the Jesuits by the Spaniards in that year was fatal for the Abipones. When they attempted to resume their former lifestyles they found their traditional lands occupied by settlers and other nations.[2] The Tobas and Moobobis, aided by disease, destroyed them as a nation in the course of less than half a century.[3] The survivors assimilated into the general Argentinian population.[2] They learned to speak Spanish, and abandoned their old customs.

Full article ▸

related documents
Hypsipyle
Rangi and Papa
Erathipa
Cumhall
Lucretia
Neleus
Abinadab
Baiame
Atropos
Astydameia
Icarius
Emperor Keikō
Xuthus
Chryseis
Gwen Teirbron
Bres
Dymas
Tyro
Laertes
Phereclus
Third Age
Augeas
Zechariah (Hebrew prophet)
Móði and Magni
Tarshish
Naboth
Polydorus
Hiram I
Metanira
Gelert