Alpha-Methyltryptamine

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α-Methyltryptamine (αMT), is a psychedelic, stimulant, and entactogen drug of the tryptamine class.[2][3]

Contents

History

Originally believed to act merely as monoamine oxidase inhibitors, αMT and its close structural analogue α-ethyltryptamine (αET) were first used as antidepressants in the 1960s under the trade names Indopan and Monase, respectively.[2] However, within a short amount of time both drugs fell out of clinical use due to toxicity and abuse concerns. αMT was also lightly used as a street drug for its psychedelic effects during this time period.

In the 1990s αMT resurfaced as a drug of recreational use via easy access through the internet, leading to its placement along with 5-MeO-DiPT as schedule I controlled substances in the Controlled Substances Act of the United States on April 4, 2003. αMT is still legal in most of the world and has continued to be encountered as a drug of abuse.

Chemistry

αMT is tryptamine with a methyl substituent at the alpha carbon. Its chemical relation to tryptamine is analogous to that of amphetamine to phenethylamine, amphetamine being α-methylphenethylamine. αMT is closely related to the neurotransmitter serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine) which partially explains its mechanism of action.

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