Amadeus III of Savoy

related topics
{son, year, death}
{church, century, christian}
{war, force, army}
{line, north, south}
{area, part, region}

Amadeus III of Savoy (1095, Carignano, Piedmont - 1148) was Count of Savoy and Maurienne from 1103 until his death. He was also known as the Crusader. [1]

He was the son of Humbert II of Savoy and Gisela of Burgundy, the daughter of William I of Burgundy. He succeeded as count of Savoy upon the death of his father. Amadeus had a tendency to exaggerate his titles, and also claimed to be Duke of Lombardy, Duke of Burgundy, Duke of Chablais, and vicar of the Holy Roman Empire, the latter of which had been given to his father by Henry IV, Holy Roman Emperor.

He helped restore the Abbey of St. Maurice of Agaune, in which the former kings of Burgundy had been crowned, and of which he himself was abbot until 1147. He also founded the Abbey of St. Sulpicius in Bugey, Tamié Abbey in the Bauges, and Hautecombe Abbey on the Lac du Bourget.

In 1128, Amadeus extended his realm, known as the "Old Chablais", by adding to it the region extending from the Arve to the Dranse d'Abondance, which came to be called the "New Chablais" with its capital at St. Moritz. Despite his marriage to Mahaut, he still fought against his brother-in-law Guy, who was killed at the Battle of Montmeillan. Following this, King Louis VI of France, married to Amadeus' sister Adélaide de Maurienne, attempted to confiscate Savoy. Amadeus was saved by the intercession of Peter the Hermit, and by his promise to participate in Louis' planned crusade.

In 1147, he accompanied his nephew Louis VII of France and his wife Eleanor of Aquitaine on the Second Crusade. He financed his expedition with help from a loan from the Abbey of St. Maurice. In his retinue were many barons from Savoy, including the lords of Faucigny, Seyssel, La Chambre, Miolans, Montbel, Thoire, Montmayeur, Vienne, Viry, La Palude, Blonay, Chevron-Villette, Chignin, and Châtillon. Amadeus travelled south through Italy to Brindisi, where he crossed over to Durazzo, and marched east along the Via Egnatia to meet Louis at Constantinople in late 1147. After crossing into Anatolia, Amadeus, who was leading the vanguard, became separated from Louis near Laodicea, and Louis' forces were almost entirely destroyed.

Full article ▸

related documents
John I, Duke of Brabant
Mary Disraeli, 1st Viscountess Beaconsfield
René of Anjou
Bartholomew de Badlesmere, 1st Baron Badlesmere
Vsevolod I of Kiev
Emperor Toba
Thomas I of Savoy
Haakon I of Norway
Hostilian
George II of Great Britain
Emperor Go-Horikawa
Casimir II the Just
Henry I of Navarre
Henry VII, Holy Roman Emperor
Chlothar III
Feodor I of Russia
Albert I of Germany
Anne de Mowbray, 8th Countess of Norfolk
Queen Sonja of Norway
Louis II of Hungary
James Tyrrell
Abbas I of Egypt
Ingrid of Sweden
Ferdinand III, Grand Duke of Tuscany
Clodius Albinus
Caesarion
Emperor Chōkei
Afonso II of Portugal
Edgar the Peaceful
John II of Castile