American English

related topics
{language, word, form}
{film, series, show}
{black, white, people}
{@card@, make, design}
{land, century, early}
{day, year, event}
{line, north, south}
{car, race, vehicle}
{government, party, election}
{area, community, home}
{build, building, house}
{city, large, area}
{food, make, wine}
{island, water, area}
{specie, animal, plant}
{school, student, university}
{ship, engine, design}
{album, band, music}
{area, part, region}
{system, computer, user}
{style, bgcolor, rowspan}

Orthography

Fiction

American English (variously abbreviated AmE, AE, AmEng, USEng, en-US,[1] also known as United States English, or U.S. English) is a set of dialects of the English language used mostly in the United States. Approximately two-thirds of native speakers of English live in the United States.[2]

English is the most common language in the United States. Though the U.S. federal government has no official language, English is the only language used by the federal government and is considered the de facto language of the United States because of its widespread use. English has been given official status by 28 of the 50 state governments.

The use of English in the United States was inherited from British colonization. The first wave of English-speaking settlers arrived in North America in the 17th century. During that time, there were also speakers in North America of Spanish, French, Dutch, German, Norwegian, Swedish, Scots, Welsh, Irish, Scottish Gaelic, Finnish, Russian (in Alaska), and numerous Native American languages.

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