Anabaptist

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Jesus Christ is the central figure of Christianity.

Eastern Orthodox · Oriental Orthodox (Miaphysite) · Assyrian

Jehovah's Witness · Latter Day Saint · Unitarian · Christadelphian · Oneness Pentecostal · Iglesia ni Cristo

Anabaptists (Greek ανα (again, twice) +βαπτιζω (baptize), thus "re-baptizers"[1]) are Christians of the Radical Reformation of 16th-century Europe, and their direct descendents, particularly the Amish, Brethren, Hutterites, and Mennonites.

Anabaptists rejected conventional Christian practices such as wearing wedding rings, taking oaths, and participating in civil government. They adhered to a literal interpretation of the Sermon on the Mount and Believer's baptism. The name Anabaptist is derived from this, because credobaptism ("believers' baptism") was considered heresy by all other major Christian denominations at the time of the reformation period, as they saw baptism as necessary for salvation and thus wrong to delay baptism until later in life. Anabaptists required that candidates be able to make their own confessions of faith and so refused baptism to infants. As a result, Anabaptists were heavily persecuted during the 16th century and into the 17th by both Roman Catholics and other Protestants.

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