Anarcho-syndicalism

related topics
{theory, work, human}
{government, party, election}
{company, market, business}
{group, member, jewish}
{black, white, people}
{rate, high, increase}
{war, force, army}
{country, population, people}
{area, part, region}
{school, student, university}

Anarcho-syndicalism is a branch of anarchism which focuses on the labour movement.[1] Syndicalisme is a French word, ultimately derived from the Greek, meaning "trade unionism" – hence, the "syndicalism" qualification. Syndicalism is an alternative co-operative economic system. Adherents view it as a potential force for revolutionary social change, replacing capitalism and the state with a new society, democratically self-managed by workers.

Anarcho-syndicalists seek to abolish the wage system, regarding it as wage slavery, and state or private ownership of the means of production, which they believe lead to class divisions. Not all seek to abolish money per se. Ralph Chaplin states that "the ultimate aim of the General Strike as regards wages is to give to each producer the full product of his labor. The demand for better wages becomes revolutionary only when it is coupled with the demand that the exploitation of labor must cease."[2]

Additionally, anarcho-syndicalists regard the state as a profoundly anti-worker institution. They view the primary purpose of the State as being the defence of private property and therefore of economic, social and political privilege, even when such defence denies its citizens the ability to enjoy material independence and the social autonomy which springs from it.[3] In contrast to other bodies of thought (Marxism-Leninism being a prime example), anarcho-syndicalists deny that there can be any kind of workers' state, or a state which acts in the interests of workers, as opposed to those of the rich and powerful. Reflecting the anarchist philosophy from which it draws its primary inspiration, anarcho-syndicalism holds to the idea that power corrupts.[4]

Although anarcho-syndicalism originated close to the beginning of the twentieth century, it remains a popular and active school of anarchism today and has many supporters as well as many currently active organizations. Anarcho-syndicalist trade unionists, being socialist anarchists, vary in their points of view on anarchist economic arrangements from a collectivist anarchism type economic system to an anarcho-communist economic system.[5]

Contents

Full article ▸

related documents
Democratic socialism
Political spectrum
Negotiation
Maoism
Bush Doctrine
Right-wing politics
Hundred Flowers Campaign
Dignitatis Humanae
Thatcherism
Mixed economy
Corporatism
Dictatorship of the proletariat
Chen Duxiu
World government
History of the United States National Security Council 1977–1981
William Godwin
Categorization
Proposition
Psychoanalytic literary criticism
Visual thinking
Otto Neurath
Newcomb's paradox
Human Potential Movement
International Workingmen's Association
Auguste Comte
John Anderson (philosopher)
Nyaya
Rupert Sheldrake
Franz Brentano
Gorgias