Angitia

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In Roman mythology, Angitia (also Angita or Angu'ita) is a snake goddess who was worshipped by the Marsi people of central Italy. She was believed to have been once a being who actually lived in that neighbourhood, taught the people remedies against the poison of serpents, and had derived her name from being able to kill serpents by her incantations.[1]

As snakes were often associated with the healing arts in ancient Roman mythology, Angita is believed to have been mainly a goddess of healing. She was particularly venerated by the Marsi, a people from central Italy (may be same as Angita). She had powers of witchcraft and was a master in the art of miraculous and herbal healing, especially when it came to snakebites. She was also attributed with a wide range of powers over snakes, including the power to kill snakes with a touch. Many Romans claim that she is the same as Bona Dea.

According to the account given by Servius, the goddess was of Greek origin, for Arigitia was the name given by the Marrubians to Medea, who after having left Colchis came to Italy with Jason and taught the people the above mentioned remedies. Silius Italicus identifies her completely with Medea. Her name occurs in several inscriptions, in one of which she is mentioned along with Angerona, and in another her name appears in the plural form. From a third inscription it seems that she had a temple and a treasury belonging to it. The Silvia Angitia between Alba and lake Fucinus derived its name from her.[1]

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