Anti-psychiatry

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Anti-psychiatry is a configuration of groups and theoretical constructs that emerged in the 1960s, and questioned the fundamental assumptions and practices of psychiatry, such as its claim that it achieves universal, scientific objectivity. Its igniting influences were Michel Foucault, R.D. Laing, Thomas Szasz and, in Italy, Franco Basaglia. The term was first used by the psychiatrist David Cooper in 1967.[1]

Two central contentions of the anti-psychiatry movement are that:

Other key criticisms of mainstream psychiatry include:

Some mental health professionals and academics profess anti-psychiatry views,[4] as do a number of former and current users of psychiatric services.[5] Some critics focus their attention on what is known as biological psychiatry.[6][7][8] Proponents of some allegedly anti-psychiatric views seek to distance themselves from the term, both for its pejorative associations, and because they regard their theories and methods as evidence-based but not yet accepted by the mainstream psychiatric community.[9]

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