Aphrodisiac

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An aphrodisiac is a substance that increases sexual desire.[1][2] The name comes from Aphrodite, the Greek goddess of sexuality and love. Throughout history, many foods, drinks, and behaviors have had a reputation for making sex more attainable and/or pleasurable. However, from a historical and scientific standpoint, the alleged results may have been mainly due to mere belief by their users that they would be effective (i.e., the placebo effect). In particular, Western medical science has no substantiated claims that any particular food increases sexual desire or performance.[3]

Some purported aphrodisiacs gain their reputation from the principles of sympathetic magic, for example oysters, due to their shape. The same factor explains the trade in the phallic-looking horn of the rhinoceros. Other animal-based aphrodisiacs gain their reputation from the apparent virility or aggressiveness of the animal source, such as tiger penis.

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Aphrodisiacs

Testosterone

Libido is clearly linked to levels of sex hormones, particularly testosterone.[4] When a reduced sex drive occurs in individuals with relatively low levels of testosterone[5] (e.g., post-menopausal women or men over age 60[6]), testosterone supplements will often increase libido. Approaches using a number of precursors intended to raise testosterone levels have been effective in older males,[7] but have not fared well when tested on other groups.[8]

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