Apocalypse

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An Apocalypse (Greek: Ἀποκάλυψις Apokálypsis; "lifting of the veil" or "revelation") is a disclosure of something hidden from the majority of mankind in an era dominated by falsehood and misconception, i.e. the veil to be lifted.

The term also can refer to the eschatological final battle, the Armageddon, and the idea of an end of the world. In Christianity The Apocalypse of John is the Book of Revelation, the last book of the Christian Bible.

Contents

Characteristic feature

Dreams or visions

The disclosure of future events is made through a dream, as was the experience for the prophet Daniel,[1] which is recorded in the book with his name, or a vision as was recorded by John in the Book of Revelation. Moreover, the manner of the revelation and the experience of the one who received it are generally prominent.

The primary example of apocalyptic literature in the Bible is the book of Daniel. After a long period of fasting,[2] Daniel is standing by a river when a heavenly being appears to him, and the revelation follows (Daniel 10:2ff). John, in the New Testament Revelation (1:9ff), has a like experience, told in very similar words. Compare also the first chapter of the Greek Apocalypse of Baruch; and the Syriac Apocalypse of Baruch, vi.1ff, xiii.1ff, lv.1-3. Or, as the prophet lies upon his bed, distressed for the future of his people, he falls into a sort of trance, and in "the visions of his head" is shown the future. This is the case in Daniel 7:1ff; 2 Esdras 3:1-3; and in the Book of Enoch, i.2 and following. As to the description of the effect of the vision upon the seer, see Daniel 8:27; Enoch, lx.3; 2 Esdras 5:14

Angels

The introduction of Angels as the bearers of the revelationary is a standing feature. At least four types or ranks of angels are mentioned in biblical scripture: the Archangels, Angels, Cherubim[3][4][5][6][7][8][9] and the Seraphim.[10] God may give instructions through the medium of these heavenly messengers, and who act as the seer's guide. God may also personally give a revelation, as is shown in the Book of Revelation through the person of Jesus Christ. The Book of Genesis speaks of the "Angel" bringing forth the apocalypse.

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