Arabian mythology

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Arabian mythology comprises the ancient, pre-Islamic beliefs of the Arabs.

Prior to Islam on the Arabian Peninsula in 622, the physical centre of Islam, the Kaaba of Mecca, was covered in symbols representing the myriad demons, djinn, demigods and other assorted creatures which represented the profoundly polytheistic environment of pre-Islamic Ancient Arabia. We can infer from this plurality an exceptionally broad context in which mythology could flourish.[1]

Stories of genies, ghouls, magic lamps, flying carpets, and wishes contained in tales from the Arabian Nights and other works have been passed down through the generations.

The concept of the Evil Eye is mentioned in the Qur'an, in Surat al-Falaq (in which one is told to seek refuge "from the mischief of the envious one as he envies"). The Hand of Fatima is sometimes used to neutralize the effect of Evil Eye.[2] Among traditional Muslims, various verses from the Qur'an such as an-Nas and al-Falaq are sometimes recited for blessing.

Contents

Gods in Arabian mythology

The Father:

Hubal (Arabic: هبل‎) Regarded as the chief god of gods and the most notable one, the idol of Hubal was near the Kaaba in mecca and was made of red agate, and shaped like a human, but with the right hand broken off and replaced with a golden hand.[3]

The Three Goddesses:

Other notable gods:

Supernatural beings

Spirits:

Monsters:

Notes

Jinn are also known as genies

See also

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