Ardipithecus

related topics
{specie, animal, plant}
{island, water, area}
{work, book, publish}
{rate, high, increase}

Ardipithecus kadabba
Ardipithecus ramidus

Ardipithecus is a very early hominin genus. Two species are described in the literature: A. ramidus, which lived about 4.4 million years ago[1] during the early Pliocene, and A. kadabba, dated to approximately 5.6 million years ago (late Miocene).[2]

Contents

Ardipithecus ramidus

A. ramidus was named in September 1994. The first fossil find was dated to 4.4 million years ago based on its interval between two volcanic strata: the basal Gaala Tuff Complex (GATC) and the Daam Aatu Basaltic Tuff (DABT).[3] The name Ardipithecus ramidus stems mostly from the Afar language, in which Ardi means "ground/floor" and ramid means "root". The pithecus portion of the name is from the Greek word for "ape".[4] Its distinguishing characteristics are bipedalism incorporating an arboreal grasping hallux or big toe, reduced canine teeth and a smaller brain size comparable to that of the modern chimpanzee.

In 1992–1993 a research team headed by Tim White discovered the first A. ramidus fossils—seventeen fragments including skull, mandible, teeth and arm bones—from the Afar Depression in the Middle Awash river valley of Ethiopia. More fragments were recovered in 1994, amounting to 45% of the total skeleton. This fossil was originally described as a species of Australopithecus, but White and his colleagues later published a note in the same journal renaming the fossil under a new genus, Ardipithecus. Between 1999 and 2003, a multidisciplinary team led by Sileshi Semaw discovered bones and teeth of nine A. ramidus individuals at As Duma in the Gona Western Margin of Ethiopia's Afar Region.[5] The fossils were dated to between 4.32 and 4.51 million years old.[6]

Full article ▸

related documents
Quetzalcoatlus
Bulbul
Harrier (dog)
Vertebrate
Wisent
Green swordtail
Canary
Honey Possum
Cheirogaleidae
Wren
Ecological niche
Sugar Glider
Bilateria
Daphnia
Devon Rex
Galago
Larch
Charadriiformes
Archaeocyatha
Show cat
Domestic longhaired cat
Porcupine
Quadruped
Odonata
Lorisidae
Nightjar
Chelicerata
Fly
Testudines
Jerboa