Argos

related topics
{city, large, area}
{god, call, give}
{son, year, death}
{war, force, army}
{country, population, people}
{land, century, early}
{area, part, region}
{mi², represent, 1st}
{language, word, form}
{film, series, show}

Argos (Greek: Ἄργος, Árgos, [ˈarɣos]) is a city in Greece in the Peloponnese, 11 kilometres from Nafplion, which was its historic harbour. A settlement of great antiquity, Argos has been continuously inhabited for the past 7,000 years,[2] making it one of the oldest cities in Greece and Europe. At a strategic location on the fertile plain of Argolis, Argos was a major stronghold during the Mycenean era. In classical times Argos was a powerful rival of Sparta for dominance over the Peloponnese, but was eventually shunned by other Greek city-states after remaining neutral during the Greco-Persian Wars. Numerous ancient monuments can be found in the city today, the most famous of which is the renowned Heraion of Argos, though agriculture (particularly citrus production) is the mainstay of the local economy.

Contents

Name

The region of Argos is known as the Argolis, Argolid, or Argeia. The inhabitants of Argos were known as Ἀργεῖοι (< *Ἀργεῖϝοι) or Argīvī in Latin, rendered Argives in English.

The name might be of pre-Greek ("Pelasgian") derivation; the name of its acropolis, Larissa, certainly is. Aitiology derives it from a mythological founder, Argos son of Zeus and Niobe (see also Danaus). If the name is Indo-European, it may be related to the adjective αργóς (argós) 'shimmering' or 'quick') from PIE *h₂erǵ-, hence also ἄργυρος (árguros) 'silver' with a meaning "shining brightly" or similar.

Full article ▸

related documents
Giza
Boeotia
Aventine Hill
Wolfsburg
Sydenham
Kirkstall
Etterbeek
Loire-Atlantique
London Borough of Islington
Saarbrücken
Matsumoto, Nagano
Finchley
Norbiton
Boulogne-sur-Mer
Upminster
Pontefract
Aldeburgh
Groenlo
Enkhuizen
Osbaldwick
Harlesden
Alphen aan den Rijn
Escanaba, Michigan
Clapham
Sheringham Park
Waddon
Bydgoszcz
Stockwell
Axminster
Woluwe-Saint-Pierre