Arthur Jensen

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Arthur Robert Jensen (born August 24, 1923) is a Professor Emeritus of educational psychology at the University of California, Berkeley.[1] Jensen is known for his work in psychometrics and differential psychology, which is concerned with how and why individuals differ behaviorally from one another.

He is a major proponent of the hereditarian position in the nature versus nurture debate, the position that concludes genetics play a significant role in behavioral traits, such as intelligence and personality. He is the author of over 400 scientific papers published in refereed journals[2] and currently sits on the editorial boards of the scientific journals Intelligence and Personality and Individual Differences.[3]

While he has been rated as one of the top-50 eminent psychologists of the 20th Century,[4] Jensen remains a controversial figure, largely for his conclusions based on his and other research regarding the causes of race-based differences in intelligence.

Contents

Biography

Jensen was born August 24, 1923, to a father of Danish ancestry and a mother who was half Polish Jewish and half German.[5] He studied at University of California, Berkeley (B.A. 1945), San Diego State College (M.A., 1952) and Columbia University (Ph.D., 1956), and did his doctoral thesis on the Thematic Apperception Test. From 1956 through 1958, he did his postdoctoral research at the University of London, Institute of Psychiatry.

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