Artificial life

related topics
{theory, work, human}
{system, computer, user}
{math, number, function}
{specie, animal, plant}
{work, book, publish}
{acid, form, water}
{album, band, music}

Artificial life (commonly Alife or alife) is a field of study and an associated art form which examine systems related to life, its processes, and its evolution through simulations using computer models, robotics, and biochemistry.[1] The discipline was named by Christopher Langton, an American computer scientist, in 1986.[2] There are three main kinds of alife[3], named for their approaches: soft[4], from software; hard[5], from hardware; and wet, from biochemistry. Artificial life imitates traditional biology by trying to recreate biological phenomena.[6] The term "artificial life" is often used to specifically refer to soft alife.[7]

Contents

Overview

Artificial life studies the logic of living systems in artificial environments. The goal is to study the phenomena of living systems in order to come to an understanding of the complex information processing that defines such systems.

Full article ▸

related documents
Baconian method
Ethnology
Behavior
Four Temperaments
Integrity
Observation
Principle (disambiguation)
Simile
Great man theory
The Blind Watchmaker
Hierarchical organization
Social epistemology
Deception
Robert Nozick
Ralph Cudworth
Hedonism
Norm (sociology)
Internalization
Sanity
Allegory
James P. Hogan (writer)
Biostatistics
Thought
Samuel Bailey
Incompatible-properties argument
Daniel Dennett
Cargo cult science
Discovery (observation)
Classical unities
Viruses of the Mind