Assyria

related topics
{god, call, give}
{church, century, christian}
{war, force, army}
{country, population, people}
{language, word, form}
{son, year, death}
{land, century, early}
{area, part, region}
{math, energy, light}
{line, north, south}
{city, population, household}
{@card@, make, design}
{mi², represent, 1st}
{city, large, area}
{village, small, smallsup}

Assyria was a Semitic Akkadian kingdom centered on the Upper Tigris river, in Mesopotamia (present day Iraq), that came to rule regional empires a number of times through history. It was named for its original capital, the ancient city of Assur (Akkadian: 𒀸𒋗𒁺 𐎹 Aššūrāyu; Arabic: أشور Aššûr; Hebrew: אַשושּׁוּר Aššûr, Aramaic: ܐܬܘܪ Aṯur. The term Assyria can also refer to the geographic region or heartland where these empires were centered. Their descendants still live in the region today, and they form part of the Christian minority.

During the ancient Assyrian period (20th to 15th centuries BC), Assur controlled much of Upper Mesopotamia and parts of Asia Minor. In the Middle Assyrian period (15th to 10th centuries BC), its influence waned and was subsequently regained in a series of conquests. The Neo-Assyrian Empire of the Early Iron Age (911 – 612 BC) expanded further, and under Ashurbanipal (r. 668 – 627 BC) for a few decades controlled all of the Fertile Crescent, as well as Egypt, before succumbing to Neo-Babylonian and Median expansion, which were in turn conquered by the Persian Empire.

Contents

Full article ▸

related documents
History of Sumer
Nazareth
Tabernacle
Kingdom of Asturias
Temple of Artemis
Babylonia
Tertullian
Prester John
Christian cross
Christian views on magic
Apostles' Creed
Anthony the Great
Venus (mythology)
Papias
Jerome
Book of Mosiah
Rudra
Dalai Lama
Christ
Etruscan mythology
Arawn
Nichiren Shōshū
Glorfindel
Shazam (comics)
Glaucus
Iðunn
Týr
Phoenicia
Nevi'im
Achelous