Atomic absorption spectroscopy

related topics
{acid, form, water}
{math, energy, light}
{@card@, make, design}
{system, computer, user}
{game, team, player}

Atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) is a spectroanalytical procedure for the qualitative and quantitative determination of chemical elements employing the absorption of optical radiation (light) by free atoms in the gaseous state. In analytical chemistry the technique is used for determining the concentration of a particular element (the analyte) in a sample to be analyzed. AAS can be used to determine over 70 different elements in solution or directly in solid samples. Atomic absorption spectrometry was first used as an analytical technique, and the underlying principles were established in the second half of the 19th century by Robert Wilhelm Bunsen and Gustav Robert Kirchhoff, both professors at the University of Heidelberg, Germany. The modern form of AAS was largely developed during the 1950s by a team of Australian Chemists. They were led by Sir Alan Walsh at the CSIRO (Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization), Division of Chemical Physics, in Melbourne, Australia.

Contents

Full article ▸

related documents
Gaseous fission reactor
Beta particle
Triple point
Hematite
Osmotic pressure
Colloid
Metastability
Transuranium element
Condensation polymer
Peptidoglycan
Promethium
Cell biology
Bicarbonate
Active transport
Humus
Tyrosine
Heavy metal (chemistry)
Vacuum flask
Berkelium
ANFO
Allotropy
Hydrophobe
Perchloric acid
Reverse transcriptase
Complementary DNA
Spinel
Triple-alpha process
Alloy
Actinium
Sodium cyanide