Augur

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Priesthoods of
ancient Rome

Marcus Aurelius sacrificing

Pontifices · Augures ·
Vestales · Flamines ·
Septemviri epulonum ·
Quindecimviri sacris faciundis

Fetiales · Fratres Arvales ·
Salii · Titii · Luperci ·
Sodales Augustales

Pontifex Maximus · Rex Sacrorum ·
Flamen Dialis · Flamen Martialis ·
Flamen Quirinalis ·
Rex Nemorensis · Curio maximus

Virgo Vestalis Maxima ·
Flaminica Dialis · Regina sacrorum

Religion in ancient Rome
Imperial cult
Glossary of ancient Roman religion
Gallo-Roman religion

The augur was a priest and official in the classical world, especially ancient Rome and Etruria. His main role was to interpret the will of the gods by studying the flight of birds: whether they are flying in groups/alone, what noises they make as they fly, direction of flight and what kind of birds they are. This was known as "taking the auspices." The ceremony and function of the augur was central to any major undertaking in Roman society—public or private—including matters of war, commerce, and religion.

The Roman historian Livy stresses the importance of the augurs: "Who does not know that this city was founded only after taking the auspices, that everything in war and in peace, at home and abroad, was done only after taking the auspices?"[1]

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