Authorized King James Version

related topics
{language, word, form}
{work, book, publish}
{church, century, christian}
{god, call, give}
{law, state, case}
{company, market, business}
{style, bgcolor, rowspan}

In the beginning God created the heaven and the earth. And the earth was without form, and void; and darkness was upon the face of the deep. And the Spirit of God moved upon the face of the waters. And God said, Let there be light: and there was light.

Genesis 1:1 in other translations

For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life.

John 3:16 in other translations

The Authorized King James Version is an English translation by the Church of England of the Christian Bible begun in 1604 and completed in 1611.[3] First printed by the King's Printer, Robert Barker,[4][5] this was the third such official translation into English; the first having been the Great Bible commissioned by the Church of England in the reign of King Henry VIII, and the second having been the Bishop's Bible of 1568.[6] In January 1604, King James I of England convened the Hampton Court Conference where a new English version was conceived in response to the perceived problems of the earlier translations as detected by the Puritans,[7] a faction within the Church of England.[8]

James gave the translators instructions intended to guarantee that the new version would conform to the ecclesiology and reflect the episcopal structure of the Church of England and its beliefs about an ordained clergy.[9] The translation was by 47 scholars, all of whom were members of the Church of England.[10] In common with most other translations of the period, the New Testament was translated from Greek, the Old Testament was translated from Hebrew text, while the Apocrypha were translated from the Greek and Latin.

In the Book of Common Prayer (1662), the text of the Authorized Version replaced the text of the Great Bible — for Epistle and Gospel readings—and as such was authorized by Act of Parliament.[11] By the first half of the 18th century, the Authorized Version was effectively unchallenged as the English translation used in Anglican and other Protestant churches. Over the course of the 18th century, the Authorized Version supplanted the Latin Vulgate as the standard version of scripture for English speaking scholars.

Full article ▸

related documents
New World Translation of the Holy Scriptures
Oxford English Dictionary
Waka (poetry)
Masoretic Text
Anglo-Saxons
Ge'ez language
Shorthand
Article (grammar)
Kannada language
Vulgate
Novial
Elvish languages (Middle-earth)
Tengwar
Doric Greek
Standard Alphabet by Lepsius
Xhosa language
Indo-Aryan languages
Kazakh language
Comma (punctuation)
Library
Pali
Morphology (linguistics)
Measure word
Latin grammar
Yeshivish
Lingala language
Lexical category
Barbarian
List of linguistics topics
Hakka Chinese