Bard

related topics
{language, word, form}
{god, call, give}
{theory, work, human}
{album, band, music}
{work, book, publish}
{son, year, death}
{film, series, show}
{law, state, case}
{group, member, jewish}
{school, student, university}
{church, century, christian}
{service, military, aircraft}
{style, bgcolor, rowspan}

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British Iron Age religion
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Mabinogion
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Druids · Bards · Vates

Samhain, Calan Gaeaf
Imbolc, Gŵyl Fair
Beltane, Calan Mai
Lughnasadh, Calan Awst

In medieval Gaelic and British culture (Ireland, Scotland, Wales, Isle of Man, Brittany and Cornwall) a bard was a professional poet, employed by a patron, such as a monarch or nobleman, to commemorate the patron's ancestors and to praise the patron's own activities.

Originally a specific class of poet, contrasting with another class known as fili in Ireland and Highland Scotland, the term "bard", with the decline of living bardic tradition in the modern period, acquired generic meanings of an epic author/singer/narrator, comparable with the terms in other cultures: minstrel, skald/scop, rhapsode, udgatar, griot, ashik) or any poets, especially famous ones. For example, William Shakespeare is known as The Bard.[1]

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