Berlin Philharmonic

related topics
{album, band, music}
{government, party, election}
{build, building, house}
{work, book, publish}
{city, large, area}
{war, force, army}
{company, market, business}
{son, year, death}

The Berlin Philharmonic, German: Berliner Philharmoniker, formerly Berliner Philharmonisches Orchester (BPO), is an orchestra based in Berlin, Germany. In 2006, a group of ten European media outlets voted the Berlin Philharmonic number three on a list of "top ten European Orchestras", after the Vienna Philharmonic and the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra,[1] while in 2008 it was voted the world's number two orchestra in a survey among leading international music critics organized by the British magazine Gramophone (behind the Concertgebouw).[2] Its primary concert venue is the Philharmonie, located in the Kulturforum area of the city. Since 2002, its principal conductor is Sir Simon Rattle. The BPO also supports several chamber music ensembles. The funding for the organization is subsidized by the city of Berlin and a partnership with Deutsche Bank.

Contents

History

The Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra was founded in Berlin in 1882 by 54 musicians under the name Frühere Bilsesche Kapelle (literally, "Former Bilse's Band"); the group broke away from their previous conductor Benjamin Bilse after he announced his intention of taking the band on a fourth-class train to Warsaw for a concert. The orchestra was renamed and reorganized under the financial management of Hermann Wolff in 1887. Their new conductor was Ludwig von Brenner; in 1887 Hans von Bülow, one of the most esteemed conductors in the world, took over the post. This helped to establish the orchestra's international reputation, and guests Hans Richter, Felix von Weingartner, Richard Strauss, Gustav Mahler, Johannes Brahms and Edvard Grieg conducted the orchestra over the next few years. Programmes of this period show that the orchestra possessed only 46 strings, much less than the Wagnerian ideal of 64.

In 1895, Arthur Nikisch became chief conductor, and was succeeded in 1923 by Wilhelm Furtwängler. Despite several changes in leadership, the orchestra continued to perform throughout World War II. After Furtwängler fled to Switzerland in 1945, Leo Borchard became chief conductor. This arrangement lasted only a few months, as Borchard was accidentally shot and killed by the American forces occupying Berlin. Sergiu Celibidache then took over as chief conductor for seven years, from 1945 to 1952. Furtwängler returned in 1952 and conducted the orchestra until his death in 1954.

Full article ▸

related documents
Johann Joachim Quantz
Henry Fillmore
Earl Scruggs
John Mayall & the Bluesbreakers
My War
Tones on Tail
Fleming and John
Nervous Breakdown
Weta (band)
Electroclash
Wild Mood Swings
Maggotron
Raised on Radio
AK1200
Lee Ranaldo
Stig Anderson
Richard Leveridge
Keep the Faith
Hanin Elias
S&M (album)
Murat Ses
The Crickets
The Doors (album)
Kid 606
Nile (band)
Flower of Scotland
Cleveland Orchestra
Peace Sells... but Who's Buying?
Darn Floor-Big Bite
List of U.S. state songs