Beryl

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The mineral beryl is a beryllium aluminium cyclosilicate with the chemical formula Be3Al2(SiO3)6. The hexagonal crystals of beryl may be very small or range to several meters in size. Terminated crystals are relatively rare. Pure beryl is colorless, but it is frequently tinted by impurities; possible colors are green, blue, yellow, red, and white.

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Etymology

The name beryl is derived (via Latin: Beryllus, Old French: beryl, and Middle English: beril) from Greek βήρυλλος beryllos which referred to a precious blue-green color-of-sea-water stone[1] and originated from Prakrit veruliya (वॆरुलिय‌) and Pali veḷuriya (वेलुरिय); veḷiru (भेलिरु) or, viḷar (भिलर्), "to become pale"; ultimately from Sanskrit वैडूर्य vaidurya-, which is of Dravidian origin, maybe from the name of Belur.[3] The term was later adopted for the mineral beryl more exclusively.[2] The word Βήρυλλος was abbreviated as βρυλλ brill which produced the Italian word brillare meaning "shine", the French word brille meaning "shine" and the English word brilliance. [4]

Deposits

Beryl of various colors is found most commonly in granitic pegmatites, but also occurs in mica schists in the Ural Mountains, and limestone in Colombia. Beryl is often associated with tin and tungsten ore bodies. Beryl is found in Europe in Norway, Austria, Germany, Sweden (especially morganite), and Ireland, as well as Brazil, Colombia, Madagascar, Mozambique, Russia, South Africa, the United States, and Zambia. U.S. beryl locations are in California, Colorado, Connecticut, Idaho, Maine, New Hampshire, North Carolina, South Dakota and Utah.

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