Blitz BASIC

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Blitz BASIC is a commercial compiler for the programming language BASIC. Originally developed on the Amiga, Blitz BASIC compilers are now available on several platforms. The Blitz products are mainly designed for programming games but also feature support for graphical user interfaces and general applications. The term Blitz BASIC is often used to refer to the general syntax used in the entire range of Blitz languages, as well as the original product that started them.

Contents

History

The first Blitz language that was designed by Mark Sibly was for the Amiga computer and published by the Australian company Memory and Storage Technology.

After returning to New Zealand, Blitz2 was published several years later by Acid Software (a local 90's Amiga game publisher).

BlitzBasic

Otherwise known as Blitz2D, Blitz Basic was released in October 2000 for Microsoft Windows and allowed only 2D graphics. It was published by Idigicon.

Recognition of Blitz Basic increased when a limited range of "free" versions were distributed on popular UK computer magazines such as PC Format. This resulted in a legal dispute between the developer and publisher which was eventually amicably resolved.

Blitz3D

Blitz3D was released in September 2001, competing with other similar PC game-development languages of the time (such as Dark Basic). Blitz3D extended Blitz Basic's command-set with the inclusion of a brand-new 3D engine, providing a BASIC style API for creating, manipulating and rendering three-dimensional objects. Blitz3D is built on top of DirectX 7 and as such was released solely for Microsoft Windows.

Although originally Blitz3D's distribution rights were owned by Idigicon, Blitz Research Ltd. later signed a deal with the firm so as to allow Blitz Research Ltd. to distribute Blitz3D themselves. In return, Idigicon were granted full rights to distribute Blitz Basic and to clear any outstanding stock copies of Blitz 3D.

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