Boston transportation

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The Boston transportation system includes roadway, rail, air, and sea options for passenger and freight transit. The Massachusetts Port Authority (Massport) operates the Port of Boston, which includes a container shipping facility in South Boston, and Logan International Airport in East Boston. The Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority (MBTA) operates bus, subway, short distance rail, and water ferry passenger services throughout the city and region. Amtrak operates passenger rail service to and from major north-eastern cities. A major bus terminal at South Station is served by varied intercity bus companies. The city is bisected by major highways, I-90 and I-93, the intersection of which has recently undergone a major renovation, nicknamed the Big Dig.

Contents

Road transportation

Road infrastructure

The streets of Boston, Massachusetts may seem as though they were not planned—a common fiction is that they evolved from old cowpaths—but in the 17th century they avoided swamps and marshes and followed shorelines before the original peninsula comprising the city was expanded with landfill in the 19th century. Except for the Back Bay and part of South Boston, Boston has no street grid, which is confusing for nonresident drivers. Roads change names and lose and add lanes seemingly at random, and many drivers are flummoxed by rotaries.

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