Bujinkan

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The Bujinkan (武神館) is an international ninjutsu organization based in Japan and headed by Masaaki Hatsumi. It is best known for its association with the ninja. The system taught by this group, called Bujinkan Budō Taijutsu, consists of nine separate martial arts traditions. However in recent years these ties to Ninjutsu have been called into question. There is a severe lack of historical evidence to even suggest that they teach anything remotely Ninjutsu based. Masaaki Hatsumi has even gone so far as to slowly remove all reference to Ninjutsu from the Bujinkan curriculum and have begun calling their style of taijutsu, Takamatsuden implying Masaaki Hatsumi's Sensei Toshitsugu Takamatsu created his own style of taijutsu and simply called it Ninjutsu for commercial gain.

Contents

Etymology and basic philosophy

The Bujinkan organization is the modern continuation of ninpo as carried on and adapted from its foundations in Feudal Japan. Thus Bujinkan taijutsu has many similarities with older forms of other Japanese martial arts including Aikido and Judo.

Bujinkan Budō Taijutsu practice does not normally include participation in competitions or contests, as the school's training aims to develop the skills to protect ones self and others, through the use of techniques which often focus on the disabling (breaking) of the attackers limbs and which can also intentionally cause their death.

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