Cadmium

related topics
{acid, form, water}
{disease, patient, cell}
{rate, high, increase}
{food, make, wine}
{day, year, event}

Cadmium (play /ˈkædmiəm/ KAD-mee-əm) is a chemical element with the symbol Cd and atomic number 48. The soft, bluish-white metal is chemically similar to the two other metals in group 12, zinc and mercury. Similar to zinc it prefers oxidation state +2 in most of its compounds and similar to mercury it shows a low melting point compared to transition metals. Cadmium and its congeners are not considered transition metals, in that they do not have partly filled d or f electron shells in the elemental or common oxidation states.[2] Average concentration in the earth’s crust is between 0.1 and 0.5 parts per million (ppm). It was discovered simultaneously by Stromeyer and Hermann, both in Germany, as an impurity in zinc carbonate.[3]

Cadmium occurs as a minor component in most zinc ores and therefore is a byproduct of zinc production. Cadmium was used for a long time as a pigment and for corrosion resistant plating on steel. Cadmium compounds were used to stabilize plastic. With the exception of its use in nickel-cadmium batteries and cadmium telluride solar panels, the use of cadmium is generally decreasing in its other applications. These declines have been due to competing technologies, cadmium’s toxicity in certain forms and concentration and resulting regulations.[4] Although cadmium is toxic, one enzyme, a carbonic anhydrase with cadmium as reactive center has been discovered.

Contents

Full article ▸

related documents
Ytterbium
Fuel
Boric acid
Nucleic acid
Meitnerium
SDS-PAGE
Haber process
Carbohydrate
Halogen
RNA splicing
Strontium
Nitrogen fixation
Tellurium
Oxide
Radium
Formic acid
Sodium chloride
Hydronium
Chlorophyll
Biogas
Rhodium
Scandium
Aluminium oxide
Ultramarine
Polyethylene glycol
Tungsten
Differential scanning calorimetry
Aqua regia
Coenzyme
Olivine