Carantania

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Carantania, also known as Carentania (Slovene: Karantanija, German: Karantanien, in old Slovene onomastics Korotan) was a Slavic principality that emerged in the second half of the 7th century, in the territory of present-day southern Austria and north-eastern Slovenia. Having lasted more than 300 years, it is considered one of the first Slavic states. It was the predecessor of the medieval Duchy of Carinthia.[citation needed]

Origin of the name

The name Carantania is of pre-Slavic origin. It has two possible etymologies. It may be formed from a toponymic base carant- which ultimately derives from pre-Indo-European root *karra meaning 'rock', or it may be of Celtic origin and derived from *karantos meaning 'friend, ally'.

Its Slavic name *korǫtanъ was adopted from the Latin *carantanum. The toponym Carinthia (Slovene: Koroška < Proto-Slavic *korǫt’ьsko) is also claimed to be etymologically related, deriving from pre-Slavic *carantia[1].

Territory

Carantania's capital was most likely Karnburg (Slovene: Krnski grad) in the Zollfeld Field (Gosposvetsko polje), north of modern-day town of Klagenfurt (Celovec). The principality was centered in the area of modern Carinthia, and included territories of modern Styria, most of today's East Tyrol and of the Puster Valley, the Lungau and Ennspongau regions of Salzburg, and parts of southern Upper Austria and Lower Austria. It most probably also included the territory of the modern Slovenian province of Carinthia. The few existing historical sources distinguish between two separate Slavic principalities in the Eastern Alpine area: Carantania and Carniola. The latter, which appears in historical records dating from the late 8th century, was situated in the central part of modern Slovenia. It was (at least by name) the predecessor of the later Duchy of Carniola.

The borders of the later Carantania state, which was under the feudal overlordship of the Carolingians, and its successor, the March of Carinthia, 826-976), as well as of the later Duchy of Carinthia (from 976), extended beyond historical Carantania.

History

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