Celeron

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The Celeron brand has been used by Intel for several distinct ranges of x86 CPUs targeted at budget personal computers. Celeron processors can run all IA-32 computer programs, but their performance is often significantly lower when compared to similar CPUs with higher-priced Intel CPU brands. For example, the Celeron brand will often have less cache memory, or have advanced features purposely disabled. These missing features can have a variable impact on performance, but is often very substantial. While a few of the Celeron designs have achieved surprising performance, most of the Celeron line has exhibited noticeably degraded performance.[1] This has been the primary justification for the higher cost of other Intel CPU brands versus the Celeron range.

Introduced in April 1998,[2] the first Celeron branded CPU was based on the Pentium II branded core. Subsequent Celeron branded CPUs were based on the Pentium III, Pentium 4, Pentium M, and Core 2 Duo branded processors. The latest Celeron design (as of January 2008) is based on the Core 2 Duo (Allendale). This design features independent processing cores (CPUs), but with only 25% as much cache memory as the comparable Core 2 Duo offering.

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