Celtic mythology

related topics
{god, call, give}
{language, word, form}
{country, population, people}
{theory, work, human}
{land, century, early}

Celtic polytheism
Celtic deities (list)

Irish mythology
Scottish mythology
Hebridean mythology
Tuatha Dé Danann
Mythological Cycle
Ulster Cycle
Fenian Cycle

British Iron Age religion
British mythology
Welsh mythology
Breton mythology
Mabinogion
Book of Taliesin
Trioedd Ynys Prydein

Druids · Bards · Vates

Samhain, Calan Gaeaf
Imbolc, Gŵyl Fair
Beltane, Calan Mai
Lughnasadh, Calan Awst

Celtic mythology is the mythology of Celtic polytheism, apparently the religion of the Iron Age Celts.[1] Like other Iron Age Europeans, the early Celts maintained a polytheistic mythology and religious structure. Among Celts in close contact with Ancient Rome, such as the Gauls and Celtiberians, their mythology did not survive the Roman empire, their subsequent conversion to Christianity, and the loss of their Celtic languages. It is mostly through contemporary Roman and Christian sources that their mythology has been preserved. The Celtic peoples who maintained either their political or linguistic identities (such as the Gaels, Picts, and Brythonic tribes of Great Britain and Ireland) left vestigial remnants of their forebears' mythologies, put into written form during the Middle Ages.

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