Chemical equilibrium

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In a chemical process, chemical equilibrium is the state in which the chemical activities or concentrations of the reactants and products have no net change over time. Usually, this would be the state that results when the forward chemical process proceeds at the same rate as their reverse reaction. The reaction rates of the forward and reverse reactions are generally not zero but, being equal, there are no net changes in any of the reactant or product concentrations. This process is called dynamic equilibrium.[1][2]

Contents

Introduction

In a chemical reaction, when reactants are mixed together in a reaction vessel (and heated if needed), the whole of reactants do not get converted into the products. After some time (which may be any amount of time, shorter than millionths of a second or longer than the age of the universe), the opposing reactions will have equal reaction rates, creating a dynamic equilibrium in which the ratio between reactants and products will appear fixed. This is called chemical equilibrium.

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