Chondrichthyes

related topics
{specie, animal, plant}
{disease, patient, cell}
{water, park, boat}
{line, north, south}

Elasmobranchii
Holocephali

Chondrichthyes (pronounced /kɒnˈdrɪkθi.iːz/, from Greek χονδρ- chondr- 'cartilage', ἰχθύς ichthys 'fish') or cartilaginous fishes are jawed fish with paired fins, paired nares, scales, two-chambered hearts, and skeletons made of cartilage rather than bone. The class is divided into two subclasses: Elasmobranchii (sharks, rays and skates) and Holocephali (chimaeras, sometimes called ghost sharks, which are sometimes separated into their own class).

Within the infraphylum Gnathostomata, cartilaginous fishes are distinct from all other jawed vertebrates, the extant members of which all fall into Teleostomi.

Contents

Anatomy

Skeleton

The skeleton is cartilaginous. The notochord, which is present in the young, is gradually replaced by cartilage. Chondrichthyes also lack ribs, so if they left the water, the larger species's own body weight would crush their internal organs long before they would suffocate.

As they do not have bone marrow, red blood cells are produced in the spleen and the epigonal organ (special tissue around the gonads, which is also thought to play a role in the immune system). They are also produced in an organ called Leydig's organ which is only found in cartilaginous fishes, although some do not possess it. The subclass Holocephali, which is a very specialized group, lacks both Leydig's and the epigonal organ.

Appendages

Their tough skin is covered with dermal teeth (again with Holocephali as an exception as the teeth are lost in adults, only kept on the clasping organ seen on the front of the male's head), also called placoid scales or dermal denticles, making it feel like sandpaper. In most species, all dermal denticles are oriented in one direction, making the skin feel very smooth if rubbed in one direction and very rough if rubbed in the other. Another exception, includes Torpediniformes, which have a thick and flabby body, with soft, loose skin devoid of dermal denticles and thorns.

Originally the pectoral and pelvic girdles, which do not contain any dermal elements, did not connect. In later forms, each pair of fins became ventrally connected in the middle when scapulocoracoid and pubioischiadic bars evolved. In rays, the pectoral fins have connected to the head and are very flexible.

Full article ▸

related documents
Polyploidy
Python reticulatus
Polyp
Pollinator
Platypus
Ecological selection
Marsupial
Bagworm moth
Pangolin
Manta ray
Peccary
Cuttlefish
Human genome
Passerine
Armadillo
Accipitridae
Drosophila
Hammerhead shark
Rat
Steller Sea Lion
Hippopotamus
Condor
Bryozoa
Crustacean
Smooth Newt
Komondor
Coppicing
Pheromone
Trophic dynamics
Anglerfish