Chronobiology

related topics
{specie, animal, plant}
{disease, patient, cell}
{theory, work, human}
{work, book, publish}
{math, energy, light}
{day, year, event}

Chronobiology is a field of biology that examines periodic (cyclic) phenomena in living organisms and their adaptation to solar- and lunar-related rhythms.[1] These cycles are known as biological rhythms. Chronobiology comes from the ancient Greek χρόνος (chrónos, meaning "time"), and biology, which pertains to the study, or science, of life. The related terms chronomics and chronome have been used in some cases to describe either the molecular mechanisms involved in chronobiological phenomena or the more quantitative aspects of chronobiology, particularly where comparison of cycles between organisms is required.

Chronobiological studies include but are not limited to comparative anatomy, physiology, genetics, molecular biology and behavior of organisms within biological rhythms mechanics.[1] Other aspects include development, reproduction, ecology and evolution.

Contents

Description

The variations of the timing and duration of biological activity in living organisms occur for many essential biological processes. These occur (a) in animals (eating, sleeping, mating, hibernating, migration, cellular regeneration, etc.), (b) in plants (leaf movements, photosynthetic reactions, etc.), and in microbial organisms such as fungi and protozoa. They have even been found in bacteria, especially among the cyanobacteria (aka blue-green algae, see bacterial circadian rhythms). The most important rhythm in chronobiology is the circadian rhythm, a roughly 24-hour cycle shown by physiological processes in all these organisms. The term circadian comes from the Latin circa, meaning "around" and dies, "day", meaning "approximately a day."

The circadian rhythm can further be broken down into routine cycles during the 24-hour day:[2]

  • Diurnal, which describes organisms active during daytime
  • Nocturnal, which describes organisms active in the night
  • Crepuscular, which describes animals primarily active during the dawn and dusk hours (ex: white-tailed deer, some bats)

Many other important cycles are also studied, including:

Full article ▸

related documents
Embryo
Hibernation
Coprophagia
Gene knockout
Intracytoplasmic sperm injection
Whipworm
Trypanosome
Eardrum
Ossicles
Rickettsia
Entomology
Musaceae
Rodhocetus
Thelypteridaceae
Amphiuma
Echidna
Dipper
Oology
Anomalocarid
Eastern Imperial Eagle
Fern ally
Hebe (genus)
Himalayan Tahr
Erysimum
Gentian
Bee Orchid
Ocicat
Bullhead sharks
Moraceae
Dahlia