City of David

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{church, century, christian}
{land, century, early}
{island, water, area}
{build, building, house}
{city, population, household}
{group, member, jewish}
{theory, work, human}
{line, north, south}
{war, force, army}
{village, small, smallsup}

The City of David (Hebrew: עיר דוד‎) (Ir David) (Arabic: مدينة داوود‎), biblical Jerusalem, is the oldest settled neighborhood of Jerusalem and a major archaeological site. It is a narrow ridge running south from the Temple Mount. It was a walled city in the Bronze Age and, according to tradition, it is the place where King David built his palace and established his capital. The City of David was naturally defended by the Tyropoeon Valley on its west, the Hinnom valley to the south, and the Kidron Valley on the east; although over time the once-steep valley to the west has been largely filled in.

In the ancient pre-Israelite period, the City of David was separated from the Temple Mount by the Ophel, an uninhabited area which became the seat of government under Israelite rule.[1] During the reign of Hezekiah, the walls of the city were expanded westward, enclosing a previously unwalled suburb in the area now known as the Old City of Jerusalem, west of the Temple Mount.

Today the archaeological dig and visitor center are one of the major tourist destinations in Israel. Although there is currently both Muslim and Jewish housing in the area, archeological digs are ongoing under many of the homes and it is proposed to make the entire ridge into an archaeological park.

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