Classicism

related topics
{church, century, christian}
{theory, work, human}
{math, energy, light}
{@card@, make, design}
{city, large, area}
{album, band, music}
{god, call, give}
{school, student, university}

Classicism, in the arts, refers generally to a high regard for classical antiquity, as setting standards for taste which the classicists seek to emulate. The art of classicism typically seeks to be formal and restrained: of the Discobolus Sir Kenneth Clark observed, "if we object to his restraint and compression we are simply objecting to the classicism of classic art. A violent emphasis or a sudden acceleration of rhythmic movement would have destroyed those qualities of balance and completeness through which it retained until the present century its position of authority in the restricted repertoire of visual images." [1] Classicism, as Clark noted, implies a canon of widely accepted ideal forms, whether in the Western canon that he was examining in The Nude (1956), or the Chinese classics.

Classicism is a force which is often present in post-medieval European and European influenced traditions; however, some periods felt themselves more connected to the classical ideals than others, particularly the Age of Reason, the Age of Enlightenment, and some classicizing movements in Modernism.[citation needed]

Contents

General term

Classicism is a specific genre of philosophy, expressing itself in literature, architecture, art, and music, which has Ancient Greek and Roman sources and an emphasis on society. It was particularly expressed in the Enlightenment, and the Age of Reason.

Classicism first made an appearance as such during the Italian renaissance when the fall of Byzantium and rising trade with the Islamic cultures brought a flood of knowledge about, and from, the antiquity of Europe. Until that time the identification with antiquity had been seen as a continuous history of Christendom from the conversion of Roman Emperor Constantine I. Renaissance classicism introduced a host of elements into European culture, including the application of mathematics and empiricism into art, humanism, literary and depictive realism, and formalism. Importantly it also introduced Polytheism, or "paganism", and the juxtaposition of ancient and modern.

Full article ▸

related documents
Giorgione
Cubism
Celtic Christianity
Evangelicalism
Nestorianism
Scholasticism
Synod of Whitby
Creed
Rule of Saint Benedict
Gregory of Tours
Maximus the Confessor
Early modern Europe
Impressionism
Paul Cézanne
Archbishop
First Council of Nicaea
Sedevacantism
Obelisk
Ionic order
Capitoline Hill
Tonsure
Synod
Bath Abbey
Pope Sixtus IV
Peterborough Cathedral
Pontifex Maximus
Pallium
Winchester Cathedral
Oriel College, Oxford
Leone Battista Alberti