Colusa, California

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Coordinates: 39°12′52″N 122°00′34″W / 39.21444°N 122.00944°W / 39.21444; -122.00944

Colusa (formerly, Colusi, Colusi's, Koru, and Salmon Bend) is the county seat of Colusa County, California. The population was 5,402 at the 2000 census, the July 2008 population estimate is 5,892.

Contents

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 1.7 square miles (4.3 km²), all of it land. According to the United States Geologic Survey, the city's location is at 39°12′52″N 122°00′34″W / 39.21444°N 122.00944°W / 39.21444; -122.00944.

Colusa is on the Sacramento River, which has a high levee so that the river is not clearly apparent from the city.

Colusa features a historic Chinatown, Carnegie Library building constructed in 1905, and an architecturally noteworthy courthouse built in a classical style, among its historically notable buildings. The city was founded by a Chinese monk and with its cottages and gardens gives the appearance of a Chinatown in northern China.

History

In 1850, Charles D. Semple purchased the Rancho Colus Mexican land grant on which Colusa was founded and called the place Salmon Bend. The town was founded, under the name Colusi, by Semple in 1850. The first post office was established the following year, 1851. The California legislature changed the town's (and the county's) name to Colusa in 1854. The town flourished due to its location on the Southern Pacific Railroad. Several travelers rest stops were established at various road distances from Colusa, including Five Mile House, Seven Mile House, Nine Mile House, Ten Mile House, Eleven Mile House, Fourteen Mile House (also called Sterling Ranch), Sixteen Mile House (at the current location of Princeton), and Seventeen Mile House. The original settlement of what became Colusa was originally placed at the site of Seven Mile House but subsequently removed to its current site in 1850.[1]

Demographics

As of the census[2] of 2000, there were 5,402 people, 1,897 households, and 1,365 families residing in the city. The population density was 3,244.0 people per square mile (1,248.9/km²). There were 2,016 housing units at an average density of 1,210.7/sq mi (466.1/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 68.7% White, 0.3% Black or African American, 1.8% Native American, 1.5% Asian, 0.8% Pacific Islander, 23.3% from other races, and 3.8% from two or more races. 41.7% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

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