Conjugate acid

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Within the Brønsted–Lowry acid-base theory (protonic) , a conjugate acid is the acid member, HX, of a pair of two compounds that transform into each other by gain or loss of a proton. A conjugate acid can also be seen as the chemical substance that releases, or donates, a proton in the forward chemical reaction, hence, the term acid. The base produced, X, is called the conjugate base, and it absorbs, or gains, a proton in the backward chemical reaction. In aqueous solution, the chemical reaction involved is of the form

This principle is discussed in detail in the article on acid-base reaction theories.

Tabulated below are several examples of conjugate acid-base pairs. Acid strength decreases and base strength increases down the table.

See also

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