Cougar

related topics
{specie, animal, plant}
{country, population, people}
{area, part, region}
{black, white, people}
{rate, high, increase}
{war, force, army}
{car, race, vehicle}
{son, year, death}
{god, call, give}
{game, team, player}
{water, park, boat}
{village, small, smallsup}

The cougar (Puma concolor), also known as puma, mountain lion, mountain cat, catamount or panther, depending on the region, is a mammal of the family Felidae, native to the Americas. This large, solitary cat has the greatest range of any large wild terrestrial mammal in the Western Hemisphere,[3] extending from Yukon in Canada to the southern Andes of South America. An adaptable, generalist species, the cougar is found in every major American habitat type. It is the second heaviest cat in the American continents after the jaguar. Although large, the cougar is most closely related to smaller felines.

A capable stalk-and-ambush predator, the cougar pursues a wide variety of prey. Primary food sources include ungulates such as deer, elk, moose, and bighorn sheep, as well as domestic cattle, horses and sheep, particularly in the northern part of its range. It will also hunt species as small as insects and rodents. This cat prefers habitats with dense underbrush and rocky areas for stalking, but it can also live in open areas. The cougar is territorial and persists at low population densities. Individual territory sizes depend on terrain, vegetation, and abundance of prey. While it is a large predator, it is not always the dominant species in its range, as when it competes for prey with other predators such as the jaguar, grey wolf, American Black Bear, and the grizzly bear. It is a reclusive cat and usually avoids people. Attacks on humans remain rare, despite a recent increase in frequency.[4]

Due to excessive hunting following the European colonization of the Americas and the continuing human development of cougar habitat, populations have dropped in most parts of its historical range. In particular, the cougar was extirpated in eastern North America, except for an isolated sub-population in Florida; there are many sightings that claim the animal is recolonizing parts of its former eastern territory, such as Ontario, Maine, the Upper Peninsula and northern Michigan, and southern Indiana.[5][6][7]

Full article ▸

related documents
Turtle
Seahorse
Butterfly
Shark
Archaeopteryx
Bongo (antelope)
Snake
Grizzly Bear
Fossil
Great white shark
Plant breeding
Brown Rat
Biodiversity
Orchidaceae
Neanderthal
Bird
Mollusca
Beetle
Arthropod
Pterosaur
Eucalyptus
Hybrid (biology)
Dominance (genetics)
Species
Ferret
Crocodile
Asexual reproduction
Flowering plant
Domestication of the horse
Meiosis