Couscous

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Couscous (pronounced /ˈkʊskʊs/ or /ˈkuːskuːs/) is a North African dish that has become popular in many countries. Historians have different opinions as to the origin of couscous. Some claim that couscous, like pasta, originated from China; while others trace its origin to East Africa. However the most plausible evidence points to a North African origin. Indeed, archaeological evidence dating back to the 9th Century and consisting of kitchen utensils needed to prepare this dish was found in this part of the world.

Couscous granules are made by rolling and shaping moistened semolina wheat and then coating them with finely ground wheat flour. The finished granules are roughly spherical shape and about one millimetre in diameter before cooking. Different cereals may be used regionally to produce the granules. Traditional couscous requires considerable preparation time and is usually steamed. In many places, a more-processed, quick-cook couscous is available and is particularly valued for its short preparation time. Couscous is traditionally served under a meat or vegetable stew. It can also be eaten alone, flavored or plain, warm or cold (e.g., mixed with Tabbouleh), or as a side dish.

The dish is a traditional staple food throughout West Africa, Sahel, France, Spain, and the Canary Islands, Portugal, Madeira, Italy (particularly in western Sicily's Province of Trapani), as well as in Turkey, Bulgaria, Greece, Malta, Cyprus, parts of the Middle East and India and is eaten in many other parts of the world as well.

Contents

Manufacturing

Couscous is a grain product made from semolina (coarsely ground durum wheat) or, in some regions, from coarsely ground barley or pearl millet. In Brazil, the traditional couscous is made from Cornmeals.[2]

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