Creaky voice

related topics
{language, word, form}
{disease, patient, cell}
{@card@, make, design}
{album, band, music}
{woman, child, man}
{government, party, election}
{food, make, wine}

In linguistics, creaky voice (sometimes called laryngealisation, pulse phonation, vocal fry, or glottal fry), is a special kind of phonation[1][2] in which the arytenoid cartilages in the larynx are drawn together; as a result, the vocal folds are compressed rather tightly, becoming relatively slack and compact. They vibrate irregularly at 20–50 pulses per second, about two octaves below the frequency of normal voicing, and the airflow through the glottis is very slow. However, although creaky voice may occur with very low pitch, as at the end of a long intonation unit, it can occur with any pitch.

A slight degree of laryngealisation, occurring in some Korean consonants for example, is called "stiff voice". The Danish prosodic feature stød is an example of a form of laryngealisation that has a phonemic function. Creaky voice is also prevalent in English as spoken in the Pacific Northwest of the United States.[3][4]

To represent creaky voice phonation of a phone in IPA, a diacritical tilde U+0330 ̰combining tilde below (IPA number 406) is placed below it, e.g.: [d̰].

See also

References

Ladefoged, Peter; Maddieson, Ian (1996). The Sounds of the World's Languages. Oxford: Blackwell. ISBN 0-631-19814-8. 

Full article ▸

related documents
Lakh
Illative case
T
Polabian language
Abkhaz alphabet
Bardic name
Surname
Adessive case
North American English
Sardo logudorese
Muti
Zenaga language
Ibero-Caucasian languages
Hyperbaton
Exponent (linguistics)
Deseret alphabet
Dacians
Moin
Quikscript
Bernicia
Hall
Pantoum
Onomastics
Yinglish
Aotearoa
Kanuri language
Absolutive case
Prolative case
Mano-a-mano
Possessive case