Curelom

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{language, word, form}
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The curelom and the cumom are working animals mentioned in the Book of Mormon. According to adherents of the Latter Day Saint movement who view the Book of Mormon as a literal historical record, these animals are thought to have literally existed in North and/or South America. To non-adherents, these animals are to be believed as fictional creatures of Book of Mormon Era. Joseph Smith, Jr., was the LDS Prophet who wrote the Book of Mormon. The exact intended identity of these animals is not known. Joseph Smith is not known to have elaborated on the subject of these animals. However, the animals have been a subject for discussion and speculation by Mormon thinkers and apologists. Critics of the Book of Mormon believe the curelom and cumom are not credible because they view the Book of Mormon as a 19th century work of fiction, and because paleontologists disagree with the Book of Mormon's other descriptions of fauna in the Western hemisphere, including the horse, the donkey, and the elephant.

Contents

Reference in the Book of Mormon

The curelom and cumom are mentioned only once in the Book of Mormon. The reference occurs in the Book of Ether, which is ostensibly a history of a nation of early Americans called the Jaredites who left the Tower of Babel and traveled by boat to the Western Hemisphere. There, according to the book, they found a number of animals. The narrative reads as follows:

Apologetic interpretation

According to Latter-day Saint belief, Joseph Smith translated the Book of Mormon from an ancient language. In this line of thinking, the words curelom and cumom were transliterated instead of translated, meaning that while the ancient word is roughly transmitted, the actual animal intended is ambiguous. The context may imply beasts of burden. Some Mormons have speculated about what the terms refer to, including:

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