Cyberspace

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{theory, work, human}
{system, computer, user}
{work, book, publish}
{math, energy, light}
{film, series, show}
{god, call, give}
{city, large, area}
{area, community, home}
{water, park, boat}
{area, part, region}
{math, number, function}
{service, military, aircraft}

Cyborgology
Bionics / Biomimicry
Biomedical engineering
Brain-computer interface
Cybernetics
Distributed cognition
Genetic engineering
Human ecosystem
Human enhancement
Intelligence amplification
Whole brain emulation

Theory
Cyborg theory
Postgenderism

Centers
Cyberpunk
Cyberspace

Politics
Cognitive liberty
Cyborg feminism
Extropianism
Morphological freedom
Singularitarianism
Transhumanism

Cyberspace is the electronic medium of computer networks, in which online communication takes place.[1] It is the domain of electromagnetics readily identified with the interconnected information technology required to achieve the wide range of system capabilities associated with the transport of communication and control products and services.[citation needed] Current technology integrates a number of capabilities (sensors, signals, connections, transmissions, processors, and controllers) sufficient to generate a virtual interactive experience accessible regardless of a geographic location.

Cyberspace is the dynamic realization of electromagnetic energy through the application of communication and control technology. In pragmatic terms, operations within this global domain allow an interdependent network of information technology infrastructures (ITI), telecommunications networks, computer processing systems, integrated sensors, system control networks, embedded processors and controllers common to global control and communications across the electro-magnetic environment. As a social experience, individuals can interact, exchange ideas, share information, provide social support, conduct business, direct actions, create artistic media, play games, engage in political discussion, and so on. The term is rooted in the science of cybernetics from the Greek κυβερνήτης (kybernētēs, steersman, governor, pilot, or rudder) and Norbert Wiener’s pioneering work in electronic communication and control science, a forerunner to current information theory and computer science.

The term “cyberspace” was first used by the cyberpunk science fiction author William Gibson.[2] which he would later describe as an "evocative and essentially meaningless" buzzword that could serve as a cipher for all of his cybernetic musings (see origins of the term below). Now ubiquitous, the term has become a conventional means to describe anything associated with computers, information technology, the internet and the diverse internet culture. The United States government recognizes the interconnected information technology and the interdependent network of information technology infrastructures operating across this medium as part of the US National Critical Infrastructure.[3]

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