Dacians

related topics
{language, word, form}
{god, call, give}
{area, part, region}
{country, population, people}
{war, force, army}
{island, water, area}

Indo-European topics

extinct: Anatolian · Paleo-Balkan (Dacian,
Phrygian, Thracian· Tocharian

Asia: Anatolians (Hittites, Luwians)  · Armenians  · Indo-Iranians (Iranians · Indo-Aryans)  · Tocharians  

The Dacians (Lat. Daci, Gr. Δάκαι Dákai) were an Indo-European people, the ancient inhabitants of Dacia (located in the area in and around the Carpathian mountains and east of there to the Black Sea), present-day Romania and Moldova, parts of Sarmatia (mostly in eastern Ukraine) and Scythia Minor in southeastern Europe (Romania, Serbia and Bulgaria). They spoke the Dacian language, believed related to Thracian, but were influenced culturally by the neighbouring Scythians and by the Celtic invaders of the 4th century BC.[1]

The Dacians (tribe) were known as Geton (plural Getae) in Greek writings, and as Dacus (plural Daci) and also Getae in Roman documents; also as Dagae and Gaete—see the late Roman map Tabula Peutingeriana. Strabo states that the original name of the Dacians was "daoi", which could be explained with a possible Phrygian cognate "daos", meaning "wolf". This assumption may be supported by the fact that one of the Dacian standards, the Dacian Draco, had a wolf's head. Phrygii was another name used within the region, and in later times, some Roman auxiliaries recruited from the area were referred to as Phrygi. Their capital was not Argedava near the Danube, but Sarmizegetusa, in the Sureanu mountains, in the Romanian Western Carpathians.

Contents

Full article ▸

related documents
Lakh
Illative case
T
Polabian language
Pantoum
North American English
Creaky voice
Zenaga language
Abkhaz alphabet
Bardic name
Bernicia
Surname
Moin
Adessive case
Sardo logudorese
Kanuri language
Ibero-Caucasian languages
Exponent (linguistics)
Hyperbaton
Muti
Deseret alphabet
Quikscript
Aotearoa
Hall
Yinglish
Onomastics
Absolutive case
Prolative case
Tuoba
Mano-a-mano