Dagr

related topics
{god, call, give}
{day, year, event}
{son, year, death}
{language, word, form}
{rate, high, increase}

In Norse mythology, Dagr (Old Norse "day"[1]) is day personified. This personification appears in the Poetic Edda, compiled in the 13th century from earlier traditional sources, and the Prose Edda, written in the 13th century by Snorri Sturluson. In both sources, Dagr is the stated as the son of the god Dellingr, and is associated with the bright-maned horse Skinfaxi, who "draw[s] day to mankind". The Prose Edda adds that Dagr is the son of the god Dellingr and Nótt, the personified night. Otherwise, Dagr appears as a common noun simply meaning "day" throughout Old Norse works. Connections have been proposed between Dagr and other similarly-named figures in Germanic mythology.

Contents

Attestations

Poetic Edda

Dagr is mentioned in stanzas 12 and 25 of the poem Vafþrúðnismál. In stanza 24, the god Odin (disguised as "Gagnráðr") asks the jötunn Vafþrúðnir from where the day comes, and the night and its tides. In stanza 25, Vafþrúðnir responds:

In Sigrdrífumál, after the valkyrie Sigrdrífa is woken from her sleep curse by the hero Sigurd, Sigurd asks her name, and she gives him a "memory-drink" of a drinking horn full of mead, and then Sigrdrifa says a prayer. The first verse of this prayer features a reference to the "sons of Dagr" and the "daughter of Nótt":

In the poem Hrafnagaldr Óðins, the appearance of Dagr and his horse and chariot are described:

Prose Edda

In the Prose Edda book Gylfaginning, Dagr is again personified. In chapter 10, the enthroned figure of High states that Dagr is the son of the couple of Dellingr of the Æsir and his wife Nótt ("night"). Dagr is described as "as bright and beautiful as his father's people". Odin took Dagr and his mother Nótt, gave them each a chariot and a horse — Dagr receiving the horse Skinfaxi, whose mane illuminates all the sky and the earth — and placed them in the sky to ride around the earth every 24 hours.[6]

Full article ▸

related documents
Aloadae
Gylfaginning
Busiris (Greek mythology)
Book of Ether
Korybantes
Satis
Hero and Leander
Leda (mythology)
Manes
Talos
Aztec mythology
Plutus
Dvalinn
Ungoliant
Ogma
Vesta (mythology)
Kupua
Celts and human sacrifice
Culture hero
Taygete
Seker
Sisera
Min (god)
Ho-Chunk mythology
Bhavacakra
Proserpina
Dedun
Naiad
Ibycus
Amrita