Deimos (moon)

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Deimos (pronounced /ˈdaɪməs/ DYE-məs; also /ˈdiːməs/ DEE-məs, as in Greek Δείμος), is the smaller and outer of Mars's two moons (the other being Phobos). It is named after Deimos, a figure representing dread in Greek Mythology.[6] Its systematic designation is Mars II.[6]

Contents

Discovery

Deimos was discovered by Asaph Hall, Sr. on August 12, 1877, at about 07:48 UTC (given in contemporary sources as "August 11 14:40" Washington mean time, using an astronomical convention of beginning a day at noon, so 12 hours must be added to get the actual local mean time).[7][8][9][10] Hall also discovered Phobos at the same time, after deliberately searching for Martian moons.

The names, at first spelled Phobus and Deimus, were suggested by Henry Madan (1838–1901),[6] Science Master of Eton, from Book XV of the Iliad, where Ares (the Roman god Mars) summons Dread (Deimos) and Fear (Phobos).[11]

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