Dendritic cell

related topics
{disease, patient, cell}
{specie, animal, plant}
{woman, child, man}
{work, book, publish}

Dendritic cells (DCs) are immune cells that form part of the mammalian immune system. Their main function is to process antigen material and present it on the surface to other cells of the immune system, thus functioning as antigen-presenting cells. They act as messengers between the innate and adaptive immunity.

Dendritic cells are present in small quantities in tissues that are in contact with the external environment, mainly the skin (where there is a specialized dendritic cell type called Langerhans cells) and the inner lining of the nose, lungs, stomach and intestines. They can also be found in an immature state in the blood. Once activated, they migrate to the lymphoid node where they interact with T cells and B cells to initiate and shape the adaptive immune response. At certain development stages they grow branched projections, the dendrites, that give the cell its name (δέντρο or déntro being Greek for "tree"). However, these do not have any special relation with neurons, which also possess similar appendages. Immature dendritic cells are also called veiled cells, in which case they possess large cytoplasmic 'veils' rather than dendrites.

Contents

History

Dendritic cells were first described by Paul Langerhans (Langerhans cells) in the late nineteenth century. It wasn't until 1973, however, that the term "dendritic cells" was coined by Ralph M. Steinman and Zanvil A. Cohn.[1] For discovering the central role of dendritic cells in the adaptive immune response,[2] Steinman was awarded the Albert Lasker Award for Basic Medical Research in 2007.[3]

Full article ▸

related documents
Cerebral arteriovenous malformation
Nerve
Peritoneum
Goitre
Q fever
Meconium aspiration syndrome
Catatonia
Ciclosporin
Tumor suppressor gene
Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome
Tylenol
Seasonal affective disorder
Leprosy
Gynaecology
Artificial respiration
Diabetic ketoacidosis
Laudanum
Obstetrics
Rickets
Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease
Circulatory system
Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy
Endorphin
Exocrine gland
Paralysis
Cerebral cortex
Breast reconstruction
Gastrointestinal tract
Spasticity
Pediatrics