Deucalion

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{island, water, area}
{son, year, death}
{food, make, wine}
{build, building, house}

In Greek mythology Deucalion (Ancient Greek: Δευκαλίων) was a son of Prometheus and Pronoia. The anger of Zeus was ignited by the hubris of the Pelasgians, and he decided to put an end to the Bronze Age. Lycaon, the king of Arcadia, had sacrificed a boy to Zeus, who was appalled by this cannibal offering. Zeus loosed a deluge, so that the rivers ran in torrents and the sea flooded the coastal plain, engulfed the foothills with spray, and washed everything clean. Deucalion, with the aid of his father Prometheus, was saved from this deluge by building a chest. Like his Biblical equivalent Noah and Mesopotamian counterpart Utnapishtim, he uses his chest to save himself and his wife, Pyrrah.

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Etymology

Deucalion is parallel to Biblical Noah and to Utnapishtim, the survivor of the Sumerian flood that is told in the Epic of Gilgamesh.[1][2] It has been suggested[by whom?] that Deucalion's name comes from δεύκος deucos, a variant of γλεύκος, "sweet new wine, must, sweetness"[3] + ἁλιεύς halieus "sailor, seaman, fisher".[4] His wife Pyrrha's name is somewhat more certain: it is derived from the adjective[by whom?] "πυρρός, ά, όν," meaning "flaming (figuratively, never with actual fire)" or "flame-colored, orange".

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