Dian Cecht

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In Irish mythology, Dian Cécht (Old Irish pronunciation [dʲiːən kʲeːxt]), also known as Cainte, Canta, was the God of healing to the Irish people. He was the healer for the Tuatha Dé Danann and the father of Cian, , and Cethen. His other children were Miach, Airmed, Étan the poetess,[1] and Ochtriullach.[2]

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Dian Cecht's curative well

He blessed a well called Slane, located to the west of Magh Tuireadh and east of Loch Arboch, where the Tuatha Dé could bathe in when wounded; they became healed and continued fighting. It would heal any wound but decapitation.[2]

Dian Cecht's 'boiling' of the River Barrow

It was Dian Cecht who once saved Ireland, and was indirectly the cause of the name of the River Barrow.[3] The Morrígú, the heaven-god's fierce wife, had borne a son of such terrible aspect that the physician of the gods, foreseeing danger, counselled that he should be destroyed in his infancy.[3] This was done; and Dian Cecht opened the infant's heart, and found within it three serpents, capable, when they grew to full size, of depopulating Ireland.[3] He lost no time in destroying these serpents also, and burning them into ashes, to avoid the evil which even their dead bodies might do.[3] More than this, he flung the ashes into the nearest river, for he feared that there might be danger even in them; and, indeed, so venomous were they that the river boiled up and slew every living creature in it, and therefore has been called the River Barrow, the ‘Boiling’ ever since.[3]

Dian Cecht's healing of Nuada's arm

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