Die Fledermaus

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Indigo und die vierzig Räuber (1871)
Der Karneval in Rom (1873)
Die Fledermaus (1874)
Cagliostro in Wien (1875)
Prinz Methusalem (1877)
Blindekuh (1878)
Das Spitzentuch der Königin (1880)
Der lustige Krieg (1881)
Eine Nacht in Venedig (1883)
Der Zigeunerbaron (1885)
Simplicius (1887)
Ritter Pázmán (1892)
Waldmeister (1895)
Wiener Blut (arranged
by Adolf Müller, 1899)

Die Fledermaus (The Bat) is an operetta composed by Johann Strauss II to a German libretto by Karl Haffner and Richard Genée.

Contents

Literary sources

The original source for Die Fledermaus is a farce by German playwright Julius Roderich Benedix (1811–1873), Das Gefängnis (The Prison). Another source is a French vaudeville play, Le réveillon, by Henri Meilhac and Ludovic Halévy. This was first translated by Karl Haffner into a non-musical play to be produced in Vienna. However, the peculiarly French custom of the réveillon (a midnight supper party) caused problems, which were solved by the decision to adapt the play as a libretto for Johann Strauss, with the réveillon replaced by a Viennese ball. At this point Haffner's translation was handed over for adaptation to Richard Genée, who subsequently claimed not only that he had made a fresh translation from scratch but that he had never even met Haffner.

Performance history

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